Daily Devotional




Thursday, February 11

Lord, I Love You, but...

Hebrews 6:10-12

Most of us are quick to declare our love for God, but at times our reluctance to serve Him tells a different story. Honestly consider whether you have ever found yourself saying or thinking, I love you, Lord, but don't call me to do that! Or perhaps you served Him, but with a flawed attitude: If no one else will do it, then I guess I will. What causes us to be reluctant servants?

Busyness: Sometimes our schedules are so full that there's no space to follow the Lord when we hear Him calling us to minister in a certain area. We all need "margins" in our lives if we want to abide in God's will.

Inadequacy: Perhaps you feel unqualified to serve, and you're thinking, Surely there's someone more gifted who could do that job. But that's just an excuse; the Lord promises to equip those He calls (2 Cor. 3:4-6).

Selfishness: Sacrificial service is never convenient. It may require that we change our plans, give up our comforts, or even make financial sacrifices.

Lack of love: This is the hardest for us to admit—that we just don't care enough. Our reluctance to serve others reveals a lack of devotion to the Lord. Those who love Christ with all their heart will joyfully serve Him by ministering to those in their families, workplaces, communities, and churches.

Are you quick to follow the Lord's leading when a need arises, or are you a reluctant servant who's preoccupied with your own plans and desires? Any service we offer in Jesus' name will not be in vain. You'll experience the joy of giving and the assurance that the Lord won't forget your sacrifice.

For more biblical teaching and resources from Dr. Charles Stanley, please visit www.intouch.org.

Wednesday, February 10

Impact of Prayer

Matthew 7:7-11

Those who ask will receive answers. Those who seek will find. Those who knock will see the door open. The acrostic “A-S-K” will help us remember to “ask, seek, and knock.”

The Lord wants us to pray to Him, not only because it honors Him but also because it helps us to grow deeper in our relationship with Him. Furthermore, prayer taps us into His work in the world. At any given moment, you can pray for anyone anywhere on earth and have confidence that the Lord of the entire universe will hear you and respond in the most effective fashion.

For this reason, prayer is one of the best ways to get involved in God’s mission. What a wonderful privilege it is to be able to participate in the expansion and functioning of God’s kingdom by asking the Lord to help His children and impact His creation.

Another reason the Lord instructs us to pray is to build our faith in Him. Even sinful men give gifts to their children. How much more does our holy heavenly Father enjoy giving good gifts to those who ask Him (Matt. 7:11)! It pleases Him to help us along in our faith as we learn His Word, practice His presence, and allow His thoughts and ways to become our own. The Lord also loves to answer our prayers and see us grow bolder in our walk and witness.

God’s Word tells us that He is faithful because He cannot deny Himself (2 Tim. 2:13). Be certain to set aside time every day to talk and listen to Him, and you will learn this truth firsthand


Tuesday, February 9


Prayer in the Believer's Life

Isaiah 57:15

The two most important disciplines in the life of a believer are Bible study and prayer. It is impossible to grow continually in Christ without practicing both.

Prayer is the primary means by which we talk to God, and it is also a way He teaches us. When we pray, we’re petitioning the Lord and trusting Him for the answer. In doing so, we learn to listen to Him, just as we learn to wait for His response. And He loves for us to honor Him through this spiritual act of worship called prayer.

Indeed, prayer is one of the best ways to honor God. When we pray to our heavenly Father, we are acknowledging that He is God, that He truly is “the high and exalted One who lives forever, whose name is Holy” (Isa. 57:15). God alone deserves glory, and we ascribe honor to Him when we “pray without ceasing” (1 Thess. 5:17). That is, we are to maintain a God-focused attitude throughout the day—continually asking Him to govern every detail of our lives.

Today’s passage says that our Father dwells both on a high and holy place and also with the contrite and lowly in spirit. This means that our motives and the condition of our hearts are very important in prayer. Simply wanting to “get our way” is not the spirit of prayer that honors God. Furthermore, it does not produce prayers that He will answer.

The heavenly Father longs for an intimate relationship with His children. Time spent in communication with God is the best way to grow close to Him.



Monday, February 8

The Cost of our Salvation

Philippians 2:5-8

In our world of electronic banking and credit cards, it’s easy to ignore what things cost. The same is true with sin. Our culture enjoys temporary pleasures while disregarding what God says is the price of transgression (Rom. 6:23).

The Bible tells what our sin cost Jesus. For our sake, He suffered...

Physical pain. During the hours leading up to His crucifixion, Jesus was mocked, beaten, and humiliated. (See John 19.) In His weakened state, He was forced to carry on His shoulders the instrument of His death—the cross. Then He was nailed to it and hoisted up to die an excruciating death.

Man’s sin. Jesus lived a perfect life on earth and never knew the disgrace of sin or the bitterness of regret. But at the cross, the Father placed all of mankind’s sins upon the Savior (2 Cor. 5:21). There, Christ experienced the fullness of our transgressions, guilt, and shame.

Abandonment. In the final hours, Jesus was separated from His Father  (Mark 15:34), their fellowship broken for the only time since eternity past. Our sin became the barrier that kept them apart until Jesus Christ’s work of atonement was finished (John 19:30).

Divine judgment. God’s wrath was poured out on Jesus because of man’s sin. Christ experienced the condemnation we deserved (Isa. 53:5-6; Rom. 5:9).

Our Savior suffered greatly on our behalf, shedding His blood so we might become part of God’s family (John 1:12). He calls us to a life of sacrificial service—doing the Father’s work and living to please Him. In light of what our salvation cost, how can we do anything less?



Sunday, February 7


Walking by Faith

2 Corinthians 5:6-8

In the Christian community, we often hear the term faith. However, when such a word is used frequently, it can become so familiar that we grow immune to its great depth of meaning. Today let’s consider what faith actually entails.

All people have faith. For example, it takes a measure of confidence to sit down in a kitchen chair without first testing its strength. Yet belief in the fact that furniture will hold our weight is quite different from entrusting our life to almighty God. A wrong judgment concerning the first may result in a physical bruise, whereas the latter determines not only our success in this life but also our eternal destination.

So what, exactly, is a biblical definition of faith? Hebrews 11:1 tells us that it is “the assurance of things hoped for, the conviction of things not seen.” And we know that it is impossible to please the Lord without faith (Heb. 11:6). In fact, there is nothing we can do that will earn salvation; the only way to heaven is by having confidence in Jesus’ substitutionary, sacrificial death on the cross, which paid the penalty we owed for our sin. What’s more, faith is nothing we can create within ourselves; Scripture is clear that it is a gift of God (Eph. 2:8).

Have you accepted the heavenly Father’s gift of faith and embarked on the wonderful journey that He invites you to share with Him? God responds to searching hearts. If you are unclear whether you have trusted your life to Him with full confidence, ask Him to guide you and reveal truth.


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